Esposito, Concetta (2017) Adolescents' exposure to community violence: links with cognitive, affective and temperamental dimensions. [Tesi di dottorato]

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Item Type: Tesi di dottorato
Lingua: English
Title: Adolescents' exposure to community violence: links with cognitive, affective and temperamental dimensions.
Creators:
CreatorsEmail
Esposito, Concettaconcetta.esposito3@unina.it
Date: 10 December 2017
Number of Pages: 157
Institution: Università degli Studi di Napoli Federico II
Department: dep26
Dottorato: phd056
Ciclo di dottorato: 30
Coordinatore del Corso di dottorato:
nomeemail
Striano, Mauramaura.striano@unina.it
Tutor:
nomeemail
Bacchini, DarioUNSPECIFIED
Date: 10 December 2017
Number of Pages: 157
Uncontrolled Keywords: community violence; effortful control; desensitization; adolescence
Settori scientifico-disciplinari del MIUR: Area 11 - Scienze storiche, filosofiche, pedagogiche e psicologiche > M-PSI/04 - Psicologia dello sviluppo e psicologia dell'educazione
Date Deposited: 19 Dec 2017 11:39
Last Modified: 22 Mar 2019 11:08
URI: http://www.fedoa.unina.it/id/eprint/12150

Abstract

The present dissertation offers a contribution to the comprehension of the psychological and behavioral correlates of being exposed to community violence in a sample of Italian adolescents. The focus on the Italian context is a first important novelty in the research literature on the topic of community violence exposure, which has a long tradition in US, whilst its prevalence and the investigation of its consequences are relatively unexplored in adolescents living in European communities. Specifically, we examined (i) how self-regulatory temperament (i.e., effortful control) is longitudinally linked to community violence exposure and aggressive behavior, and (ii) whether a desensitization mechanism, both cognitive and emotional, can be invoked in the explanation of the relation between community violence and aggressive behavior. Implications and future directions are discussed.

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