Fournier, Stéphane (2021) Coronary physiology: From new evidence supporting clinical benefit to new less invasive technologies. [Tesi di dottorato]

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Item Type: Tesi di dottorato
Resource language: English
Title: Coronary physiology: From new evidence supporting clinical benefit to new less invasive technologies
Creators:
CreatorsEmail
Fournier, StéphaneUNSPECIFIED
Date: 20 December 2021
Number of Pages: 108
Institution: Università degli Studi di Napoli Federico II
Department: Medicina Molecolare e Biotecnologie Mediche
Dottorato: Cardiovascular Pathophysiology and Therapeutics
Ciclo di dottorato: 34
Coordinatore del Corso di dottorato:
nomeemail
Izzo, Raffaeleraffaele.izzo@unina.it
Tutor:
nomeemail
Barbato, EmanueleUNSPECIFIED
Date: 20 December 2021
Number of Pages: 108
Keywords: FFR, Fisiologia Coronarica
Settori scientifico-disciplinari del MIUR: Area 06 - Scienze mediche > MED/11 - Malattie dell'apparato cardiovascolare
Date Deposited: 29 Dec 2021 15:16
Last Modified: 28 Feb 2024 12:04
URI: http://www.fedoa.unina.it/id/eprint/14273

Collection description

Fractional Flow Reserve (FFR) was introduced in the 1990s as an index of the physiological significance of a coronary stenosis. FFR represents the ratio of maximal blood flow in a stenotic artery as compared with normal maximal flow. In practice, during invasive coronary angiography, FFR is obtained by calculating the ratio of the distal coronary pressure to the aortic pressure (measured with a coronary pressure guidewire and a guiding catheter, respectively). Over time, the benefits of FFR-guided coronary revascularization have been well demonstrated, leading to its incorporation into clinical guidelines. However, FFR suffers from several limitations that were sources of inspiration for this PhD thesis. These limitations have been divided into four chapters addressing: 1) the lack of data supporting the benefit of FFR in terms of improving hard clinical endpoints and the lack of data supporting the benefit of FFR the field of coronary artery bypass graft surgery, 2) the absence of information obtained by FFR on the microcirculation, 3) the risks associated with maneuvering a pressure wire down a coronary artery and 4) the general risks associated with invasive coronary angiography.

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